The Treaty of Ghent, 1814

December 24, 1814 – Representatives of Britain and the United States sign the Treaty of Ghent, ending the War of 1812.

Signed in the city of Ghent, Belgium, this treaty restored relations between the two nations to status quo ante bellum, restoring the borders of the two countries to the lines before the war started in June 1812.  The Treaty was approved by the UK parliament and signed into law by the Prince Regent (the future King George IV) on December 30, 1814. It took a month for news of the peace treaty to reach the United States, and in the meantime American forces under Andrew Jackson won the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815. The Treaty of Ghent was not fully in effect until it was ratified by the U.S. Senate unanimously on February 17, 1815. It began two centuries of peaceful relations between the U.S. and Britain, although there were a few tense moments such as the Trent Affair.

Belgium issued a semi-postal stamp on May 16, 1964 commemorating the 150th anniversary of the treaty’s signing.

treaty-of-ghent-belgium-1964-semipostal

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